Friday, April 19, 2019
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Tag: #musicandliterature

How to stage a controversy: Carl Nielsen’s Aladdin

Carl Nielsen’s Aladdin score is astonishingly evocative and shamelessly theatrical. But it's not just the music that made a lot of noise at the 1919 premiere...

🎧 One Thing to Listen for in Unsuk Chin’s Alice in...

The "talking" bass clarinet impersonating a caterpillar. Life in Unsuk Chin's psychadelic version of wonderland sure is a trip!

Episodes in the life of an artist: The astonishing life and...

150 years after Hector Berlioz's death, we recognise a man who dauntlessly pursued his artistic vision — his life and music a complex web of passion...

Did Berlioz really say all that!?

Take the #Berlioz150 quiz if you dare and see if you can tell Berlioz from Beethoven, Shakespeare and Goethe!

🎧 One Thing to Listen for in Debussy’s Prélude à l’après-midi...

The opening flute solo. In just four measures, Debussy sets the tone for the sensual dream-like atmosphere that characterizes the whole piece.

What stories make the best operas?

There are certain things that every opera needs to have. One is brilliant music, of course. And another is an enthralling plot. But where do opera’s stories come from?

How can you turn as gruesome a tale as Hansel and...

From gruesome tale to Christmas tradition, follow Hansel und Gretel on their journey into the woods and onto the opera stage...

This Week in Music History: The premiere of Strauss’s Salome (1905)

Strauss’s opera Salome scandalized the musical world in 1905—and again in May 1906, when, as Ross vividly describes, the Austrian premiere in Graz drew together an astonishing array of musical luminaries, from Mahler to Schoenberg to Puccini. “Like a flash of lightning,” Ross writes, “it illuminated a musical world on the verge of traumatic change. Past and future were colliding; centuries were passing in the night.”

The Classical Coven

Double, double toil and treble! Today we're sharing a playlist of some of our favorite witches in the classical repertoire—some scarier than others...

This Week in Music History: Franz Liszt is born (1811)

Franz Liszt was born in the Hungarian town of Raiding on October 22, 1811—a little more than a year after the births of Chopin and Schumann. Unlike those two composers, however, he reached old age: he died at 75, three years after his friend and son-in-law Richard Wagner. He’s one of very few composers whose life makes the 19th century look rather short.