Saturday, April 20, 2019
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This Week in Music History: The premiere of Beethoven’s Eroica Symphony...

Napoleon may have ceased to be Beethoven’s hero, but the composer and his imposing Eroica Symphony have a heroism of their own.

This Week in Music History: The riotous premiere of The Rite...

The riot that took place at The Rite of Spring premiere in Paris is almost as notorious as the work itself. Stravinsky set the stage for scandal....

This Week in Music History: The premiere of Monteverdi’s L’Orfeo (1607)

Claudio Monteverdi’s L’Orfeo isn’t the first opera. But it’s remarkably close.

This Week in Music History: The premiere of Bruckner’s Ninth Symphony...

“I dedicate my last work to the majesty of all majesties, the beloved God, and hope that he will give me so much time to complete the same,” he is alleged to have said.

This Week in Music History: Verdi’s Falstaff premieres (1893)

Certain facts speak for themselves when it comes to the premiere...

This Week in Music History: The premiere of Brahms’s First Piano...

Full of Christmas cheer, Brahms wrote to Clara Schumann in December 1857:

This Week in Music History: The premiere of Mozart’s (completed) Requiem...

“As obscure as it is strange,” was how Mozart’s first biographer, Franz Xaver Niemetschek, described the story of his Requiem in 1798.

This Week in Music History: The premiere of Strauss’s Salome (1905)

Strauss’s opera Salome scandalized the musical world in 1905—and again in May 1906, when, as Ross vividly describes, the Austrian premiere in Graz drew together an astonishing array of musical luminaries, from Mahler to Schoenberg to Puccini. “Like a flash of lightning,” Ross writes, “it illuminated a musical world on the verge of traumatic change. Past and future were colliding; centuries were passing in the night.”

This Week in Music History: Bartók’s Concerto for Orchestra premieres (1944)

Hugely renowned in his native Europe, the young Béla Bartók can hardly have imagined that he would receive perhaps the most important commission of his life while languishing with an unknown disease on a hospital bed in New York, after several barren years. But the final chapter in Bartók’s life story was full of surprises.

This Week in Music History: Benjamin Britten is born (1913)

Benjamin Britten was born on November 22, 1913—St Cecilia’s Day, the patron saint of music—in Lowestoft, Suffolk, overlooking the English east coast. Music and the English coast were the forces that would shape his life. These twin influences were combined in perhaps the most profound way a full century after Britten’s birth.